FOMO Marketing, Part I: The Psychology of “FOMO”

June 10, 2021

The fear of missing out, or the phenomenon better known as “FOMO,” certainly has its hooks in western society, and not just in young adults. It describes those feelings of anxiety we get about being left out of a group, missing a significant event, or not being part of the story people are telling. Social media has lit a fire under the idea of FOMO, being that we have a 24/7 curated peek into everyone’s lives, but FOMO has existed as long as humans have. As funny as it sounds, FOMO started out as a survival mechanism. 

FOMO: The Evolutionary Advantage

It stems from the brain’s limbic system, or more specifically, the amygdala, whose job it is to detect threats to our survival. For early humans, there was an evolutionary advantage to being a part of a group or community — a better chance at securing food, water, shelter, protection, etc. The loneliness of FOMO is really our brain saying, “Don’t get left behind!” Ultimately, when we get the impression or feeling that we’re not part of the “in” group, our “fight or flight” response kicks in. Community, while still vital, doesn’t necessarily mean the same thing anymore, but we still desire and need human connection. 

Creating a Better Connection

Now, social media has muddled the definition of FOMO, or at least complicated it. It’s no longer just the urge for connection, it’s also the potential for a better connection. We have a lot of social options these days — you could go to dinner with friends, the movies with your family, or a networking event for work. And then, after the fact, you compare the choice you made with the posted memories of everyone you follow online.

FOMO as a Marketing Tool

These days, FOMO isn’t merely a psychological concept. It’s also a marketing tool — a modern day keeping up with the Joneses — and it can be done both skillfully and ethically. In some ways, it can seem manipulative — to tap into our primal fears — but it doesn’t have to be so predatory. Open and honest communication with your audience is a huge part of ethical FOMO marketing. Everyone should be in on it, and while yes, your bottom line is sales, the goal of content marketing is really to start a conversation about your product or brand. 

Fore more details on how to generate FOMO at your next event, product launch, or major campaign, see part two

Social media has lit a fire under the idea of FOMO, being that we have a 24/7 curated peek into everyone’s lives, but FOMO has existed as long as humans have.

Emily Laubham

Emily Laubham